Thursday, March 13, 2014

Testing a new lens

I took my new 85 mm lens (AF-S Nikkor 85mm f/1.8G) out for a walk yesterday: around the yard, over to the neighbours' gardens, and across the street to the vacant lot. I came home very happy with it, and am even happier now that I've seen the results on the computer.

First, I took only one shot at some subjects, and almost all of those photos turned out fine. Where I took three photos, I had trouble choosing which worked out better; only a very few were total duds.

Next, I stood at the edge of a garden and took photos of daffodils several meters away, and the flies perched on them turned out in focus. No need to trample a neighbour's flower bed.

The vacant lot was soggy and muddy; I had trouble finding secure places to stand; I didn't dare get down on my knees to get photos of critters, nor even bend over to shoot, for fear of losing my balance. I took photos through several inches of muddy water, and the ground underneath turned out nice and clear.

I turned over a board with my foot, and shot the underside, from a standing position. Here's what I found.

Centipedes, pill bugs, and a tiny blue-headed snail.

The lens is fast, and without the need to crawl in close, I could get the centipedes before they ran off. And get them in focus, too. I took three photos of this group of wood bugs; all three turned out ok.

Large egg case. The shadow turned out a bit noisy.

On the mud where the board had been. The cluster of eggs glowed a true lime-green. I don't know what laid them.

Egg case, in a pale yellow web.

There were a few miniature red ants running on one end of the board, so tiny I had to bend over to see them. The camera did get them, but barely.

More test shots tomorrow, maybe the water pics.

Stumble Upon Toolbar


Elva Paulson said...

That pale yellow egg case might be made by a European Cross spider. It looks very much like the one I found.

Susannah Anderson said...

You're probably right. The spiderlings inside the case are a bright yellow, and almost ready to hatch, so the colour would shine through.